Join the Global Campaign - From people to leaders! Act on AMR NOW!

10 facts related to the Global Call for Action - From People to Leaders: Act on AMR NOW!

From people to leaders: Act on AMR now!

Antimicrobial resistance is a global health threat that affects all aspects of life, including human and animal health, economies and ecosystems, and which could seriously jeopardize the achievement of several of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) in 2030. Given below are ten facts about the impact of AMR as well as the state of the global response to it currently.

1. Mortality

In 2019, antibiotic resistance directly caused an estimated 1.27 million deaths worldwide, with the highest burden in western sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Further, almost 5 million deaths were estimated to be associated with it (1).

2. Impact on life expectancy

2. At the current level of action against AMR, there would be an average loss of 1.8 years of life expectancy by 2035, with some low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) seeing life expectancy decline by 2.5 years (2).

3. Healthcare costs and lost productivity

AMR would cost the world $412 billion a year in healthcare costs and $443 billion in lost productivity (3).

4. Multisectoral coordination

Only 50% of countries have a functional multisectoral coordination mechanism to help prioritize, cost, implement and monitor AMR national action plans (4).

5. GDP loss and increase in poverty

According to a World Bank study, a high-impact scenario of antimicrobial resistance could cause low-income countries to lose more than 5 percent of their gross domestic product and push up to 28 million people into extreme poverty by 2050 (5).

6. Role of Communities

Community-based interventions, such as training local health workers and promoting handwashing, can reduce antibiotic use by up to 40% (6).

7. Lack of access to antibiotics

7.7 million die from bacterial infections each year, many of these due to lack of access to effective antibiotics (7).

8. Lack of clean water and sanitation

Lack of access to clean water and sanitation contributes to the spread of AMR, with 2 billion people worldwide lacking access to safe drinking water (8).

9. Lack of IPC programmes

Just 35% of countries of 163 countries surveyed had national Infection, Prevention and  Control (IPC) programmes based on WHO IPC core components, that are being implemented nationwide, and regularly evaluated (9).

10. Need for investments

Investing in AMR interventions, including community engagement and WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene) improvements, can yield a return of $5-$7 per dollar spent (10).

References:
1. Murray, C. J., et al. (2022). Global burden of bacterial antimicrobial resistance in 2019: a systematic analysis. The Lancet, 399(10325), 629-655.
2. Towards specific commitments and action in the response to antimicrobial resistance. Global Leaders Group on AMR Report. April 2024. 
3. Towards specific commitments and action in the response to antimicrobial resistance. Global Leaders Group on AMR Report. April 2024.
4. More countries committing to tackling antimicrobial resistance. WHO. 2021
5.“Drug-Resistant Infections: A Threat to our Economic Future”. World Bank. 2017
6. Cross, E. L., et al. (2019). Reducing antibiotic prescribing in primary care: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Primary Health Care Research & Development, 20.
7. Ikuta, K. S., Swetschinski, L. R., Aguilar, G. R., Sharara, F., Mestrovic, T., Gray, A. P., … & Dhingra, S. (2022). Global mortality associated with 33 bacterial pathogens in 2019: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019. The Lancet, 400(10369), 2221-2248.
8. Progress on household drinking water, sanitation and hygiene 2000-2020: five years into the SDGs. WHO & UNICEF. 2021
9. More countries committing to tackling antimicrobial resistance. WHO. 2021.
10. “Drug-Resistant Infections: A Threat to our Economic Future”. World Bank. 2017

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